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Listing:

Subject: Student Volunteers at 2002 SfAA Conference
Date: Feb 10, 2001
From:Anne Ballenger, Chair SfAA Student Committee

SfAA Conference March 6 -10, 2002 in Atlanta,Ga.
Student Events

Dear Students,
We have some wonderful opportunities for you at this conference! Listed below are some highlights. You can view the entire Preliminary Conference Program on the SfAA web site. Please note for some events sign-up is neccessary. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me at anneball@erols.com.

Student Orientation: Wed 12:00 p.m.
This session will provide you with an overall perspective of the Conference, highlight student events and activities, and offers the expert advise and recommendations by the Conference Chair, Ben Blount and Past Presidents of SfAA. I will be there, along with Carla (our Conference Sub-Committee Chair) to provide advise and general enthusiam.... You will have ample opportunity to ask questions - in fact, we encourage you to ask as many questions as you like. Hope to see you there.
Careers in Applied Anthropology: Panel & Individual Counseling Workshop:
Wed. 3:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
This session organized by Carla and co-sponsored by the Membership Committee is an excellent method for improving your career aspirations. A highly regarded panel of practicing applied anthropologists are on hand to counsel you!

The Student Career Counseling workshop has been designed to provide graduate and undergraduate students with practical suggestions on how to acquire the necessary intellectual and practical instruments in their academic programs to find jobs as applied anthropologists inside and outside the academy. The workshop is composed of two parts: in the first part, a panel of applied anthropologists will provide general advice and suggestions in career planning; in the second part, students will have the opportunity to engage in one-on-one counseling with practitioners, scholars and applied anthropologists. These professionals will advise students about options and opportunities within their particular areas of expertise.

The workshop is free, but pre-registration is required. To register, contact Carla Guerrón-Montero at cguerron@oregon.uoregon.edu.

Poster Session: Fri. 1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Students and practitioners across the United States present their current research in poster format. Also, student poster presenters will be judged and a monetary prize is awarded. This is a wonderful opportunity to see innovations in the practice and methods of applied anthropology across disciplines, as well as, the ability to speak at length and one-on-one to presenters. The poster session is a unique venue and shouldn't be missed.
SfAA Past President & Student Luncheon: Sat.
Where can you meet the movers and shakers of applied anthropology? At this luncheon, of course. In an intimate yet, casual setting past presidents and students discuss a variety of common subjects such as current projects, dissertation and thesis ideas, method and theory, as well as, becoming acquainted and forming friendships.
Again, the Conference Committee and the Student Committee are proud to offer 25 students a free lunch! Pre-registration is required. Please contact Anne Ballenger, Student Committee Chair at anneball@erols.com to reserve your space.
Student Committee Conference Table
Want to know the latest on student parties? Want to met the Student Committee? Or maybe you'd just like to chat? Then, visit the Student Committee Conference Table and get the latest!

Listing:

Subject: Graduate Fellowship/Assistantship in Ethnography & African American Studies
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002
From: Eric Lassiter, elassite@gw.bsu.edu

Graduate Fellowship/Assistantship in Ethnography & African American Studies

The Department of Anthropology at Ball State University is offering a fellowship and teaching assistantship, "Ethnography and African American Studies", to begin August 2002 and continue for two academic years. Ball State is located in Muncie, Indiana, the site of the famous study "Middletown".

We plan to undertake a collaborative ethnographic study with Muncie's African American community entitled "The Other Side of Middletown." We seek an energetic and enthusiastic student interested in collaborative ethnography, African American studies and/or minority issues to study with the team: she or he will be expected to write a thesis on the collaborative processes of the project.

The fellowship/assistantship will continue for two academic years (2002-2004) with a stipend of approximately $7,200 per year, which includes a tuition remission. The awardee will be expected to fulfill regular teaching assistant duties in the department, with the exception of one semester when the student will join the research team full time.

Acceptance to Ball State's M.A. program is required: the deadline for this application has been extended until April 15, 2002. For more information, contact Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, elassite@bsu.edu.


Listing:

Subject: Job Advertisement
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002
From: wilkr, wilkr@indiana.edu

The Anthropology Department at Indiana University-Bloomington is seeking a zooarchaeologist for a full-time, one-year visiting position.

Applicants should have a strong research background in North American zooarchaeology, a completed PhD, and evidence of successful teaching. The person hired for this position will be responsible for managing the department's Zooarchaeology Laboratory and for teaching courses in faunal osteology, Native American subsistence and/or problems in zooarchaeology, and topics of the candidate's choosing.

Review of applications will begin March 15,2002, but materials will be accepted until the position is filled. Also, we anticipate conducting interviews at the SAA meetings in Denver in March. Candidates attending the meetings and wishing to be considered for such interviews are encouraged to contact the search committee before the meetings.

Indiana University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Minority group members, women, and disabled individuals are encouraged to apply. Send letter of application, a CV, and names of three references to Chair, Zooarchaeology Search Committee, Department of Anthropology, Student Building 130, 701 East Kirkwood Av, Bloomington IN 47405-7100. For information call 812 855-2555.


Listing:

Subject: Marine Protected Areas: Call for Papers
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002
From: Kathi R. Kitner, kathi.kitner@safmc.noaa.gov

CALL FOR PAPERS:
The following is a call for papers for a proposed invited session to be held at the American Anthropological Association's 101st meeting in New Orleans, LA, November 2002. Abstract submissions should not exceed 250 words. The deadline for submitting an abstract for consideration is February 25. The authors will be contacted shortly thereafter if their paper has been accepted.

Proposed Session on Marine Protected Areas, American Anthropological Assoc. Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA 2002
Enclosing the Marine Commons: Marine Protected Areas and the Role of Anthropology
Discussant: Bonnie McCay, Rutgers University
Organizers: Kathi R. Kitner (SAFMC) and Shankar Aswani (UCSB)

ABSTRACT:
Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), sometimes also called Marine Reserves, are today one of the most discussed topics in both US and international arenas of fishery management. In light of the stresses put on marine ecosystems due to increasing demand for not only seafood, but from rapid coastal development and related tourism, MPAs appear to offer a corrective to the problem of declining stocks and biodiversity. More broadly, the definitional form and purpose that such protected areas can take range from protecting historical/traditional artisanal fishing grounds to seasonal fishing closures, to much larger areas managed much like land-based park systems where resource utilization is prohibited. Whatever their size or structure, the growing popularity of MPAs as a means to protect the marine environment poses both unique theoretical and applied questions for anthropologists.

The first step in designing socially equitable and biologically sound marine protected areas around the world is to foster a dialogue between scholars in both the natural and social sciences. Possible topic areas for presenters include reports on historical or existing MPAs, the place of social science in planning and constructing future MPAs, the role of other social and natural sciences in MPA formation and continuity, and critiques of existing paradigms. Furthermore, what are the goals of creating MPAs, and do those goals mirror local community goals? What are the issues competing with the various desired outcomes of creating MPAs? What are the politics of MPAs?

Questions more specific to anthropology might include: what is role of informal or formal sea tenure in establishing marine protected areas? Are historical forms of sea tenure facing pressures from exogenous forces seeking to implement MPAs? What is the local response to MPAs? The outcome? How are local conflicts over fishing rights and use-rights being addressed? What forms, if any, does local resistance and/or contestation take? What do marine protected areas mean for developing alternative economies such as eco-tourism? What do such areas mean for the sustainable use of the resource by commercial fishers, both large and small-scale? Does the creation of MPAs affect local subsistence patterns or increase/decrease food security? How can models of participatory or co-management better inform the MPA creation process?

A discussion of methods employed in designing and evaluating MPAs will be part of the session. Issues to be examined: How do we measure the impacts of creating MPAs, both in social and economic terms? Are there methods for studying or creating MPAs that can be used cross-culturally, or do some methods lend themselves better to certain situations? How does working in a multi-disciplinary team setting benefit or hinder anthropological goals? Should anthropologists be involved in the design of marine protected areas and, if so, how?

INSTRUCTIONS:
Please include title of paper, author/s name/s, affiliations, and addresses including email and telephone numbers. Details for presentations and preparation of papers will be sent upon acceptance of your abstract by the session's organizers.

Submit abstracts either by mail, fax or email attachment (this is preferable). Send all abstracts to:
Kathi R. Kitner
South Atlantic Fishery Management Council
One Southpark Circle, Suite 306
Charleston, SC 29407
kathi.kitner@noaa.gov
http://www.safmc.net


Listing:

Subject: Call for participants: Panel at the SfAA Meetings in Atlanta
Date:Tue, 05 Feb 2002
From:Katherine Metzo, kmetzo@indiana.edu

I'm organizing a panel at the Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) Meetings in Atlanta, GA on March 9th, 2002. The panel is: CULTURAL HERITAGE AND POLICY: THE ROLE OF ANTHROPOLOGISTS. Since the SfAA Public Policy Committee decided in December that this is an interest area for the March meetings, I've had some difficulty finding enough panelists.

I'd like to appeal to those of you with expertise to volunteer for this panel, particularly if you are already planning to be in Atlanta for the meetings. Please contact me at kmetzo@indiana.edu if you are interested.

We would like to have a panel of about 3 specialists who have worked with policy or with policy makers on issues related to cultural heritage (world heritage sites, cultural resource management, protected areas and parks, etc.). In regards to these issues, the panel members should be able to address questions such as: What are the key policy concerns from the perspective of international organizations, national governments, and local communities? What are the moments within the policy making process where anthropological expertise would be most valuable? What raises the most difficult problems and what types of community interaction and/or local governance and/or international support might be used to resolve those problems?


Listing:

Subject: call for papers for next AAA
Date:Mon, 04 Feb 2002
From:Earle, Duncan, dearle@utep.edu

Anyone interested or know anyone interested in this issue of the creeping US-Mexico "border"?
Duncan Earle

Is the Borderlands Still On The Border?
Organized by Duncan Earle (UTEP) and Steve Folmar (Wake Forest)
The notion of the borderlands, originally defined as the unique social landscape of the US-Mexico Border, and its undermining of the relationship between nation and culture (Anzaldua), has come to appear less tied to a geopolitical space. Continuing a process of south-north migration that reaches back into the cradle of prehispanic Mesoamerica, Mexican migration has come to permeate the US interior. This particular iteration of human beings with their own ideology moving into a region to create a sense of cultural place (Velez-Ibanez) leads to cultural interactions both similar and different from those occurring on the 'mera frontera'. This session brings together those working and living on both the geopolitical border and interior frontiers. To what extent do the theories and practice developed by those involved in Borderlands studies apply to cultural relations taking place in the southeast and Midwest US? To what extent can analysis of practice and problems be transferred to these new settlements? What form will daily life take without the continual cultural recharging that occurs for those in close proximity to the US-Mexican divide? Presentations address the question of shifting borders and ask in what ways are there similarities between the borderlands encounters and the conditions of intercultural experience now facing many communities across the US. An open format invites participation from those featured, as well as others interested in the 'greater borderlands'. The object is a dialog that allows us to learn from each other, while considering broader issues of globalization and change.


Listing:

Subject: Call for Student Submissions & Travel Award for next AAA
Date:Mon, 04 Feb 2002
From: NASA

Call for Papers: NASA Undergraduate Panel, 2002
TITLE: Conspiring to Inspire: Students, Faculty, and Social Engagement
Organizers: Meli Glenn
Discussants: Dr. Brian Palmer, Harvard; others to be announced

DESCRIPTION:
Members of this panel will reflect on the possibilities for undergraduates and their teachers to create academic contexts that foster engagement with pressing human problems. One of the dilemmas of undergraduate anthropology is that practical applications of knowledge lack academic prestige. The excitement of social engagement is unknown to most students, and few are inspired to extend their studies into graduate school or to pursue careers that build upon their undergraduate training. This panel is concerned with how undergraduate curricula can encourage students to start thinking of themselves more as student anthropologists and less as anthropology students. What does it take to turn anthropology students into student anthropologists, aware of their potential power to affect the world through development work and other forms of applied anthropology? How do some anthropology undergraduates become able practitioners who use their discipline in the service of others? When and how does an anthropology curriculum inspire students to a practice of theory, an attempt to deploy what they have learned? How do dedicated teachers and mentors help students find pathways to careers in development, social service or social change? How do we cultivate courage, in others and in ourselves?

If you are interested in participating in this session, please submit a proposal of 250 words or less by e-mail to Meli Glenn, Meli.Glenn@durham.ac.uk, by March 1st, 2002. Please e-mail it as a regular e-mail, or as an MS-Word attachment. Please refer to the AAA's website (http://www.aaanet.org/) for guidelines and further information.

Proposals are encouraged both from undergraduate students and from teachers who are concerned with helping undergraduates become active practitioners. Presentations can highlight personal experience as well as possibilities for innovative teaching. Papers as well as alternative forms of presentation will be considered.

2. Call for Papers
Abstracts are invited for a student session at the 101st Annual Meeting of the AAA in New Orleans, November 20-24, 2002. The session, Keeping it Anthropological: Defining "Community" in Medical Anthropology Research, will explore how students conducting research in the medical anthropology field use and define "community" in their work. Submissions are sought that explore the theory and/or methodology of community-based health research within the discipline of Anthropology. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, health research in refugee communities, urban communities, internet communities, and aboriginal communities. The deadline for submissions is March 1st. Please email submissions to Kristen Jacklin at jacklink@mcmaster.ca.

3. Call for Posters
As emerging scholars, student anthropologists benefit enormously from presenting posters at the AAA annual meetings. Unlike traditional paper panels, poster sessions provide marvelous opportunities for in-depth discussion, exchange and networking between poster "presenters" and their "audience." To help student anthropologists take advantage of this extraordinary opportunity at the 2002 meetings in New Orleans, I am organizing a poster session around the broad theme of "gender." With this, I intend to draw poster presentations that focus on women, including for example the social construction of gender, femininities / masculinities, sexuality, violence, economic development, and similar themes. If interested in being a part of this student-friendly poster session, please send me a brief query outlining your proposed poster presentation before March 1, 2002.

Reply to Tara Hefferan, Michigan State University, THefferan@hotmail.com

4. The "NASA TRAVEL AWARD (2002)
This award " will provide partial financial support ($100.00) to NASA Members (excluding current or incoming officers and prior recipients) who successfully compete in an essay contest. The two-part topic of the essay is 1) the future direction of anthropology as a discipline and 2) what NASA's role should be as we continue to support students of this discipline. Please address both parts in your essay.

The essay must be one-page, 12-font, and double spaced. Any essays that are more than one page will not be considered. NASA reserves the right not to confer the Prize in any year in which the essays submitted to the competition are judged insufficiently prizeworthy. Please email essays to travelaward@yahoogroups.com as an attachment in .doc or .rtf format. Winners will be required to supply a copy of their student ID and round-trip travel itinerary at the NASA business meeting this November in order to receive their awards. Winners agree to have their essays published on our website. NASA will start accepting applications May 1, 2002. The deadline for receipt of all applications is October 15, 2002. For more details, contact NASA Officer Lori Johns travelaward@yahoogroups.com.


Listing:

Subject: Call for Papers at NASA Session
Date:Tue, 22 Jan 2002
From: Judy Tso,judytso@earthlink.net

Call for Papers
American Anthropology Association annual conference, 2002
NASA (National Association for Student Anthropologists)
Undergraduate Panel
Title: Conspiring to Inspire: Students, Faculty, and Social Engagement
Organizers: Meli Glenn
Discussants: Dr. Brian Palmer, Harvard; others to be announced
Description:
Members of this panel will reflect on the possibilities for undergraduates and their teachers to create academic contexts that foster engagement with pressing human problems. One of the dilemmas of undergraduate anthropology is that practical applications of knowledge lack academic prestige. The excitement of social engagement is unknown to most students, and few are inspired to extend their studies into graduate school or to pursue careers that build upon their undergraduate training.

This panel is concerned with how undergraduate curricula can encourage students to start thinking of themselves more as student anthropologists and less as anthropology students. What does it take to turn anthropology students into student anthropologists, aware of their potential power to affect the world through development work and other forms of applied anthropology? How do some anthropology undergraduates become able practitioners who use their discipline in the service ofothers? When and how does an anthropology curriculum inspire students to a practice of theory, an attempt to employ what they have learned? How do dedicated teachers and mentors help students find pathways to careers in development, social service or social change? How do we cultivate courage, in others and in ourselves?

If you are interested in participating in this session, please submit an abstract of 250 words or less by e-mail to Meli Glenn, Meli.Glenn@durham.ac.uk, by March 1st, 2002. Please e-mail it as a regular e-mail, or as an MS-Word attachment. Please refer to the AAA's website (http://www.aaanet.org/) for guidelines and further information. Abstracts are encouraged both from undergraduate students and from teachers who are concerned with helping undergraduates become active practitioners. Presentations can highlight personal experience as well as possibilities for innovative teaching. Papers as well as alternative forms of presentation will be considered.